Protecting your business

We have arrived at the seventh and final edition of our multi-part series on the topic of tasks you should be adding to your “start up to do list”. In past weeks we have discussed starting your small business checklistorganizing your startup, are you sure you need to hire now?, when do you need a lawyer? the importance of small business accounting advice and organizing your family business.

This week’s topic: Protecting your business

Often, people will mention to me that their business is like their baby. Not only that, but often their business location is like a second home. You spend countless hours planning, executing, strategizing and re-strategizing your business to achieve optimal success and end up being the first one to come in and the last one to leave.

To ensure your efforts are not in vain, you want to protect your business. Of course there are practical security measures that you could have in place. However as a business owner you may not know what’s up ahead that can make your business vulnerable.

Protecting your business is an intentional effort to identify risks that could delay, harm or derail your business from achieving its goals. Be proactive. We do not have a crystal ball to know what tomorrow may bring. Taking measures to protect your business will remove the stress if and when an emergency occurs.

So what are you protecting your business from?

  • Potential scams and fraudulent situations
  • Fines and penalties
  • Natural disasters
  • Records management
  • Weather conditions such as severe storms

Identifying the risks is an activity to expose what could potentially weaken your business and finding a solution.

Here is your final checklist. Take some time to share it with your business friends and hashtag #MyStartUp #SmallBizChecklist

☐ Emergency preparedness: Is your business ready?
☐ Not sure which permits are related to your business? Click here for BizPal.
☐ Are you aware of the rules of playing music at your business?
☐ Have you read through the countless tips that our business counsellors have written on fraud prevention?
☐ Click on Email marketing to learn to avoid the spam box with these do’s and don’ts.

This is Fraud Prevention Month. Stay tuned to read more blogs on how you can protect your business!

If you have been in business less than two years, sign up today for six months free membership to CFIB through the CFIB My StartUp program.

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Cesar Gomez-Garcia has been with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business for six years. His current role at the CFIB is helping members with their questions on compliance. These questions can range from employment standards to health and safety, as well as complicated red tape situations that small businesses face. His passion is reading and writing about entrepreneurship. Learn more about Cesar via LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter @josuegomezg.


Organizing your family business

We are now on our sixth edition of the multi-part series on the topic of tasks you should be adding to your “start up to do list”. In past weeks we have discussed starting your small business checklistorganizing your startup, are you sure you need to hire now?, when do you need a lawyer? and the importance of small business accounting advice.

This week’s topic: Organizing your family business.

Often I hear from business owners that they are being “helped” by family members when they start their business. That’s perfectly fine, however you must know that most government offices consider your family member a regular employee. That means you must follow the same rules such as the Provincial Employment Standards Act along with registering with your provincial workers compensation board.

In a previous blog I wrote titled: “Hiring a family member? Here’s why you need to consider using Employment Insurance rulings”, I identified my top five reasons why business owners hire family members:

  • Family members are available to you beyond traditional working hours or days.
  • You may be comfortable leaving your business with them for a day or two.
  • They may have a specific skill you need (e.g., a cook, graphic designer, assistant).
  • You give them an employment opportunity and experience.
  • You may be passing off your business to a family member in the future.

As part of organizing your business, identify the talents of those within your family to assess which individual you will need support from.

Determine the following factors:

  • The “need”: what tasks do you need to be completed.
  • The “who”: whom within your family holds the skills/talents/credentials to get it finished.
  • The “time”: be clear and honest on the commitment level you require (i.e. part-time/full time basis).
  • The “frequency”: If they are not required unless “by project”, say a graphic designer, understand the employees vs. self-employed rules, perhaps they are considered their own boss.
  • The “how much”: Any employee, especially family member, want to ensure they are receiving the right compensation. The Government of Canada has a great tool to ensure you’re as competitive as the job market.

Be intentional when describing each of the factors above. You will soon realize you have enough details to create a job description, and provide a letter of offer. If you require a template for these, review our CFIB site by clicking here. Employees, regardless if they are family or not, do require clear instructions to understand their role.

So to set you on the right track, here is your weekly checklist. Remember to share your checklist with your social media entrepreneur community by using: #MyStartUp and #SmallBizChecklist

☐ Have you categorized your family or friends based on skills that can help your business?
☐ Keep this in mind: EI for Family Members from Service Canada
☐ Have you considered who will be on payroll and who will be on contract? Perhaps you need a refresher Employees vs. self-employed.
☐ Do you require workers compensation?
☐ If you wish to know how much the job should pay, click here.

The Canadian Federation of Independent Business has a variety of webinars available, including one that provides you with information on the EI rulings process.

Lastly, read our Tips and tools to help manage your family business as well to get further insight.

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CesarCesar Gomez-Garcia has been with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business for six years. His current role at the CFIB is helping members with their questions on compliance. These questions can range from employment standards to health and safety, as well as complicated red tape situations that small businesses face. His passion is reading and writing about entrepreneurship. Learn more about Cesar via LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter @josuegomezg.


The importance of small business accounting advice

We are now on our fifth edition of the multi-part series on the topic of tasks you should be adding to your “start up to do list”. In past weeks we have discussed starting your small business checklistorganizing your startup, are you sure you need to hire now?, and when do you need a lawyer?

Thank you for joining us on today’s topic: Accounting advice.

I’ve had a few experiences with a number of entrepreneurs that have trustingly replaced their accountants with a “manage yourself” software. While we will not discourage you from exploring this option, always remember that the live assistance of an expert can go a long way.

In the past, common concerns or complaints with software was related to upgrades, updates and even customer support. I have heard from a variety of entrepreneurs with questions such as: does the software calculate public holidays, does it identify when a holiday is coming up?  Does this software automatically update when there are changes in taxes or source deductions? And how can I manually change the percentage of tax?

Accounting advice helps you with:

  • Learning which business entity is best for you
  • How to get paid from your own business
  • Filing your taxes; with correct documentation and on time
  • Understanding what is considered a business expense
  • A Revenue Canada Audit

Understanding the health of your business is primarily your responsibility, the entrepreneur. Not to mention that the Canada Revenue Agency also holds you responsible for collecting and remitting GST/HST and payroll taxes. So it is in your best interest to understand how to do this properly, also to know what factors impact the growth of your business. A bonus is hiring an accountant that is familiar with your particular industry.

Our business resource department is here to help you navigate the complexities of running your business, however, we recognize that professional accounting advice is crucial for the survival of your business. The assistance of an accountant is very important especially because you wish to start your business on right track.

Our members are able to contact their regional CFIB business counselor when they may not be sure if it is an accounting question. Rest assured, if we can help we will by providing you information, research or support.

So to set you on the right track, here is your weekly checklist. Remember to share your checklist with your social media entrepreneur community by using: #MyStartUp and #SmallBizChecklist

☐ Do you need to register for GST or HST? Click here for explanation.
☐ Have you hired an accountant to help you through the taxes of running a small business?
Check if there is someone local that can help: Shop Small Biz – your local business directory.
☐ Have you considered which banking service you will require? Also read our “How to get a better deal at bank
☐ Considering grants and financing?
☐ Considering using some of your revenue as donations?

If you have been in business less than two years, you qualify to sign up as a member through our My StartUp portal. If you have been in business for more than two years, please click here to obtain further information from our CFIB website on how you sign up today!

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CesarCesar Gomez-Garcia has been with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business for six years. His current role at the CFIB is helping members with their questions on compliance. These questions can range from employment standards to health and safety, as well as complicated red tape situations that small businesses face. His passion is reading and writing about entrepreneurship. Learn more about Cesar via LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter @josuegomezg.


Business to Business (B2B) Contracts – When do you need a lawyer?

Welcome to the fourth edition of the multi-part series on the topic of tasks you should be adding to your “start up to do list”. In past weeks we have discussed starting your small business checklistorganizing your startup, Are you sure you need to hire now?, and now our latest edition: Do you need a lawyer.

Every entrepreneur understands intrinsically – or learns very quickly – that a business is not an island. That is to say, a business cannot exist without interactions with outside parties in some form or another.

For example, a major part of running your business is receiving products/services from other businesses that will help in your daily operations. These interactions shouldn’t be taken lightly or handled in an informal manner.

While CFIB business counsellors do not offer legal advice, we are able to help set the stage for entering into what could be considered legal contracts. In fact, we previously published an article, Signing contracts and leases: how to avoid liability, here are some highlights:

A contract is a legal document; be sure you understand what you are signing, as it could be very costly to get out of and may even involve litigation.

  • Do not accept any verbal changes.  Make sure all changes are written into the contract.
  • If you are not sure what your obligations are, get a lawyer to review the contract and advise you of any concerns.
  • Check the contract for automatic renewal dates and be aware if you have to provide notice of cancellation.  Some contracts require up to a year’s notice, in writing, should you wish to cancel.
  •  Look for clauses that allow increases in pricing without written notice.
  •  Check the term of the contract and make sure there is an option to cancel without penalty.
  • Report any unscrupulous practices to the Competition Bureau at 1 800-348-5358 or online.

Do not feel pressured to sign on the dotted line on the spot. Take all precautions and due diligence to review and consult with your legal advisors, especially when you have to provide your banking or credit card information.

Our Business Counsellors hear of countless situations that could have been avoided if the above recommendations were followed. Remember, any business that presents a great deal should also provide you sufficient time for you to review agreements.

Your checklist of the week should also include the following very important topics:

☐ Be aware of the legal issues for small business
Seek legal advice to ensure you select the right business entity
☐ Do you know enough about Trademarks and Patents?
☐ Keep informed of possible fraud attacks to your business
☐ Tips for leasing commercial property

More often than not, we get excited to start our business venture and simply hope for the best. We want you to have the best.

When in doubt, contact a CFIB small business Business Counsellors. We can offer specific advice and even let you know if and when legal counsel is required.

If you have been in business less than two years, you qualify to sign up as a member through our MyStartUp.ca portal. If you have been in business for more than two years, please click here to obtain further information from our CFIB website on how you sign up today!

Share our blog with your entrepreneurial community using: #MyStartUp #SmallBizChecklist

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CesarCesar Gomez-Garcia has been with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business for six years. His current role at the CFIB is helping members with their questions on compliance. These questions can range from employment standards to health and safety, as well as complicated red tape situations that small businesses face. His passion is reading and writing about entrepreneurship. Learn more about Cesar via LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter @josuegomezg.


Tips and tools to help manage your family business

Family Day is being observed this year on February 20, 2017 (February 13, 2017 for British Columbia). In honor of the countless family owned businesses across Canada, we wanted to provide our My Startup family with few tools to get your family business off the ground.

It is good business practice to create a code of conduct to ensure that everyone understands the expected behavior towards each other and customers.

A Code of Conduct is set of rules/norms that are established for family members/employees to comply with. It is expected that everyone would have a full commitment to conduct business in a professional and respectable manner and strive to create a trust-worthy authentic environment.

A Code of Conduct will support the dos/don’ts on how your company culture will unfold the business vision, mission and objectives. The Code of Culture speaks to:

  • Commitment and expectations of those considered to be managers
  • Commitment and expectations of employee behaviors
  • What is considered to be respectable and professional behavior
  • What unethical behaviors are not tolerated
  • Company Policies and Procedures

Family being the closest to us by relationship, setting professional boundaries can ensure that your communication is both respectable and effective, documentation is effective and avoids confusion.

Setting the right company culture from the start is a win-win situation for all individuals working at your business. Regardless of your size of business, it is a tool that sets the level of excellence you are expecting from all your staff.

As a CFIB member and a CFIB My Startup member, you have access to a Code of Conduct template by using your membership ID and password here.

Have you considered structuring your team using the RACI method?

Recently, in completing my Business Analysis program, I became familiar with a business tool I believe can help small business. It’s called the RACI matrix and it is a method to understand the different roles in a team and to ensure everyone is aware of their own responsibilities. Understanding the roles given to each individual will reduce any risk of incomplete work.

RACI is an acronym for Responsible, Accountable, Consulted and Informed. In your next meeting with your family members, consider categorizing your family in the following categories and decide who is:

  • Responsible: Individual tasked to complete a task.
  • Accountable: One who ensures tasks are completed.
  • Consulted: A subject matter expert that is called for advice.
  • Informed: An individual that requires continual updates on progress.

While this matrix is a tool often used for projects and has elaborate methodology, having these assigned roles will maximize your chances at starting a successful venture.

Often times when you’re starting a family business, “the all hands on deck” approach may get confusing and that can lead to a loss of time, resources and duplicate work in some cases – even worse no work gets accomplished as no real accountability can be measured.

Each individual assigned to your business, needs to have clear, consistent, and achievable tasks.

Do you have a clear direction for your business?

After you have developed your team, consider the following: using the GRPI method to further understand if your team has all the necessary tools to complete the tasks you need for your business operations.

GRPI is an acronym for Goals, Roles, Processes, and Interpersonal and it’s used to assess the effectiveness of your team.

Goals: Have all goals been communicated clearly.
Roles: Using the RACI method, do you have clear roles assigned.
Interpersonal: How the team communicates with one another, especially with respect and trust.

The above factors are straight forward. For this reason let’s take some time to provide further details on Processes.

Processes: What are the steps that need to be taken to complete tasks, projects, etc.

Your business requires constant goals and tasks, and accomplishing each to keep the business alive. A process can take shape in many different forms and can be communicated in the following methods:

  • Establishing a channel of communication (Email, Skype, Phone etc.)
  • Specific time for meetings (daily, weekly etc.)
  • Creating a procedure manual that has clear instructions
  • Identifying what resources are available for all staff
  • Everyone should be encouraged to provide feedback on improving any of the above

Just like the RACI methodology, the GRPI has further layers that can be researched online to help you with your startup.

These tools are used for projects, however your startup can be seen as a project – as you plan, review, and monitor and execute your plans for your product/services.

Do you have a specific tool/methodology that has helped your business? Tweet us at #MyStartUp

Remember, as a CFIB or My Startup member you have access to our EI Family blog, number of webinars to help you manage your startup and access to our Business Counsellors.

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CesarCesar Gomez-Garcia has been with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business for six years. His current role at the CFIB is helping members with their questions on compliance. These questions can range from employment standards to health and safety, as well as complicated red tape situations that small businesses face. His passion is reading and writing about entrepreneurship. Learn more about Cesar via LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter @josuegomezg.


Are you sure you need to hire now?

Welcome to the third edition of a multi-part series on the topic of tasks you should be adding to your “start up to do list”. In past weeks we have discussed starting your small business checklist and organizing your startup. Let’s continue with the next part “Are you sure you need to hire now?”.

You may be at that stage you need to hire employee, are you ready?

I came across a business owner within my network that wanted to hire an employee as an assistant, because they felt that was the right and reasonable step. Unfortunately, hiring your first employee may not be the walk in the park that you’re hoping for.

Word to the wise: You must truly understand your business situation if you are at a stage that you need and can afford to hire an employee. Employees are not hired when you are more than capable of handling the work load on your own. Employees are hired when you need support the handling of multiple tasks and can benefit the business in providing someone experience, upgrade skills and empower the employee’s career.

Often times, we may believe that hiring employee is a sign of growth, however there are major responsibilities that come along with this stage in business. Especially understanding that you, the employer, are providing wages that in turn will be used for mortgage/rent, family care, and/or savings for employee’s future. Be conscious that it is your time to hire.

Here are few heads up:

  • When your employee earns wages, you must pay your employee consistently on a pay period you have selected. Failure to pay or in consistent manner can result in claims under your provincial Ministry of Labour.
  • More than just wages, you the employer must be prepared to compensate employees for vacation pay, public holiday pay and/or termination according to your provincial obligations.
  • You must submit sources deductions (Employment Insurance, Income Tax and Canadian Pension Plan) to the Canada Revenue Agency, regardless if your business has made a profit – no delays or excuses.

Having documentation is must:

Having proper documentation is crucial when dealing with employees. Job Descriptions are particularly important as they set the expected performance, the standard or level of satisfaction of a job, and contain clear instructions.

Often time, I hear from small business owners that they do not think they need a job description for two reasons;

  1. They are too small.
  2. All employees do the same job.

That may be the case, however you can’t expect a specific outcome or behavior if it has not been properly documented and explained to employee.

A moment to reflect:

Make a proper assessment of your situation, ask yourself:

  • Am I in a position to handle my work load on my own?
  • Do I have sufficient knowledge of the ministries that protect employees?
  • Do I have sufficient resources to provide necessary training?
  • Can I trust that someone else will have access to my place of business?
  • Do I have enough cash flow to justify hiring employee?

We have created the following checklist to ensure you are on the right track.

This week’s topic is: hiring employees

☐ Have you registered your payroll account through the Canada Revenue Agency?
☐ Have you learned rules, regulations and considerations when hiring employee?
☐ Do you need a job description? Click here.
☐ Do you need to create an internal employment manual?
☐ Do you have a business counsellor?

Remember, my entrepreneur friend, you are not alone. Become a member today by signing up at MyStartUp.ca and speak to your regional business counsellor for further information, insight and direction.

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CesarCesar Gomez-Garcia has been with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business for six years. His current role at the CFIB is helping members with their questions on compliance. These questions can range from employment standards to health and safety, as well as complicated red tape situations that small businesses face. His passion is reading and writing about entrepreneurship. Learn more about Cesar via LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter @josuegomezg.


Small Business Ideas

Free Online Courses for Independent Business Owners

As an entrepreneur, you are continuously learning and developing new skills. If you have employees, you probably encourage them to do the same.

Regardless of whether your organization would like to further understand marketing, management or even human resources, CFIB’s got you covered through their partnership with Vubiz.

CFIB’s Vubiz partnership allows you to invest in yourself and your employees with FREE online training.

The Vubiz courses give you 24/7- online access and allows you to complete the courses at your own pace from your desktop, tablet or smart phone. The Vubiz dashboard even allows you to create your profile, select from variety of courses and review your completed courses.

I’ve had the opportunity to take few of these courses such as:

  • Entrepreneurship
  • Health and Safety Certificate
  • Strategic Management
  • Hiring, Managing and Terminating
  • Introduction to Leadership
  • Interviewing
  • Selecting Top Talent
  • Job Candidate Interviewing

I found these courses to be straight forward, the platform to be easy to use and I learned so much great insight such as:

  • What questions are acceptable (and not) during interview
  • What if an employee doesn’t wish to sign their performance evaluation
  • What rules to follow when terminating an employee
  • Download few templates related to the topic Education is lifelong!
  • Check out the learning center today! You will need a membership number, so if you’ve been in business two years or less, why not sign up for CFIB’s free 6 month membership through the My Startup program! If you have been in business for longer than two years, simply sign up for a one-year CFIB membership.

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CesarCesar Gomez-Garcia has been with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business for six years. His current role at the CFIB is helping members with their questions on compliance. These questions can range from employment standards to health and safety, as well as complicated red tape situations that small businesses face. His passion is reading and writing about entrepreneurship. Learn more about Cesar via LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter @josuegomezg.


Organizing your startup

Welcome back to your second edition a multi-part series on the topic of tasks you should be adding to your “start up to do list”. The tools we provide you will be either information, resources or food for thought. We want you to protect your business straight from the get go.

Last week we discussed starting your small business checklist, this week’s topic: organizing your startup. So let’s get started with continuing your checklist. Make sure to click the links for important how-to’s and expanded information.

☐ Do you have a mentor that can help you or your employees?
☐ Are you asking yourself if your business should be a sole proprietor, partnership or incorporated.
☐ Do you require resources to conduct market research?
☐ Who are your customers and what are their demographics?
☐ Have you identified what will make your idea unique, have you written your value proposition?

You may have missed our previous blog covering the first five tasks for your to do list. Catch up by clicking here.

And remember, take some time to share it with your social community using hashtag #MyStartUp #SmallBizChecklist.

As a Canadian independent business owner, you have support! Our Business Counsellors can help you with live one-on-one help and advice. If you haven’t yet, join 109,000 other entrepreneurs who belong to CFIB. If you’ve been in business for two years or less, you can join for free via CFIB’s My Startup program.

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CCesaresar Gomez-Garcia has been with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business for six years. His current role at the CFIB is helping members with their questions on compliance. These questions can range from employment standards to health and safety, as well as complicated red tape situations that small businesses face. His passion is reading and writing about entrepreneurship. Learn more about Cesar via LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter @josuegomezg.


How to deal with returns, refunds and exchanges at your business

The holiday shopping frenzy has come to a close and with that comes a few headaches and hassles for small business owners, specifically retailers. It is no surprise, then, that at this time of year CFIB’s small business help line gets an uptick in calls about return and exchange policies. What are your rights? What are best practices? What are tips and tricks for handling long lines, which can result in disgruntled customers?

So what you do as an independent retailer? Are you required to have a return, exchange or refund policy?

This question prompted me to conduct research to determine if there are any provinces that required this practice as mandatory. As I suspected, most provinces do not have an “official” mandatory policy. You as a business owner must establish your own guidelines.

When establishing your return and exchange policy, you should ask yourself the following important questions:

  • Do my customers understand what is a final sale?
  • Do my customers receive a gift receipt – if so, what does that mean to the individual receiving the gift?
  • Can my customer return the product for their money back?
  • If my customers wish to exchange a product, what does the product need to have intact (price tag, receipt, etc.)?
  • Should I choose to issue a refund in a form of a store credit?
  • How do I rectify any complaints, if this was an online purchase?
  • Overall, how do I manage complaints, feedback and comments?

While considering this list of questions, do so with more than the immediate bottom line in mind. There are other important factors, such as:

  • How do I keep my brand and reputation intact?
  • What do I want the customer experience to be?
  • What can I do to ensure that returns/exchanges do not interfere with long-term or budding relationships?

In a Forbes article, Customer Experience is the Future of Marketing, Daniel Newman wrote “Marketing research has discovered that it takes 12 positive experiences to repair the damage caused by a single unresolved negative one. In today’s competitive business environment, even one negative experience is enough to lose a customer forever because people now are less tolerant toward poor encounters than ever before.”

With that in mind, here are 3 important areas to cover when forming your returns, refunds and/or exchange policy:

  • Clarity: Ensure your customers can see and read your policy (cash register, posted at store, on receipt, website online) and your employees fully understand what’s expected of them.
  • Trust: Perhaps the customer has lost their receipt, will you honour the request? Will it be case by case? Do you need to train employees?
  • Expectations: Some key items must be present, if you require them such as tag, receipt, within a period of time or same credit card/debit card etc.

Once you have a return, exchange or refund policy in place, honour it. Not honouring it can result in complaints to the Consumer Protection of your province.

Important Note: if you’re a member of the CFIB, contact your business counsellor to find out details about the Consumer Protection in your province.

If you’re not a member of the CFIB, click here to obtain details as to your local Consumer Protection office.

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CesarCesar Gomez-Garcia has been with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business for six years. His current role at the CFIB is helping members with their questions on compliance. These questions can range from employment standards to health and safety, as well as complicated red tape situations that small businesses face. His passion is reading and writing about entrepreneurship. Learn more about Cesar via LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter @josuegomezg.


Attention Canadian Entrepreneurs: Start Your Small Business Checklist here!

Like many people with an idea and ambition, there are probably a lot of questions running through your mind about diving into entrepreneurship. Financial resourcing, finding customers, creating a logo and building a website, are just a few examples. All questions that come to mind are not to be feared, but they have to be prioritized. Do not be afraid to admit that the journey to success can seem intimidating.

Starting a business can seem simple when you’re still in the concept stage. This is partly because many well-meaning friends and family like to offer advice like, “…it just takes registering a business, a website and social media accounts! Go for it!” There is, however, much more to it than that.

This is where I come in. I have heard from countless small business owners concerned about the impact that regulations make and the toll it takes on their daily operations – simply because they may not know where to start. Take for example, did you know that there are rules relating to marketing, advertising and sales?

So what can I offer you?

Over many years CFIB business counsellors have written amazing web posts regarding these issues. For the next several weeks, we will be providing you with a list of 7 important considerations that can help you regardless of how many years you have been in business .

Take some time to share it with your business friends and hashtag #MyStartUp #SmallBizChecklist.

Add this week’s topics to your to do list:

☐ Do you understand the rules relating to marketing, advertising and sales?

☐ Have you considered the risks if you post an image online without permission?

☐ Not sure where to begin with your social media? Click here.

☐ Do you understand what misleading advertising is?

☐ Do you need more information about Trademarks and Patents?

If you are a member of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business and have questions regarding this information  call your regional business counsellor.

If you have been in business less than two years, sign up today for six months free membership to CFIB through the CFIB MyStartup program.

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CesarCesar Gomez-Garcia has been with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business for six years. His current role at the CFIB is helping members with their questions on compliance. These questions can range from employment standards to health and safety, as well as complicated red tape situations that small businesses face. His passion is reading and writing about entrepreneurship. Learn more about Cesar via LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter @josuegomezg.